Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CSPAN2 32
LANGUAGE
English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> i know you've heard this my times, but i loved your show on cnn that you had a few years ago. why did you decide to play the straight man? [inaudible] who are putting a deal together for hbo and john kline was the president, john kline, the president of cnn. they said we'll put you on tv right now. i was overwhelmed because it was the first time i didn't know what i was supposed to be. and a precipice to be a news journalist. at some point i found out that i was just supposed to be in the end it was like landing in russia. it was a total culture shock, but i learned a lot about myself and i learned a lot i think about people and their consumption of news. it was fun that would shape the way i started to see things. [inaudible conversations] >> no you don't. >> on the topic of wealth and qatar, do you think we have this level of wealth that americans would still have a thirst for learning? i feel like that is something that is missing from our society. >> there's never been a society more wealthy. there's also never been a generation less curious. i think we have been consumed. we
for those who had cast the numbers had less attention. one hill over cnn team watched rescuers trying to free an 11 year-old girl. sheet they could reach her but did not have the equipment to dig her out. they debated to sever her leg but the invitation would kill her with no blood. he said on a neighboring hill there is a posh hotel with dozens of american and french in chile and rescuers trying to work one who is trapped by the screaming stopped them cold it took the rest of the day to pull the girl out. she died of injuries two days later. most foreign rescuers without clear orders were to go. the haitian government had no reporting mechanism and no formal coordination between international organizations or the u.s. task force. for officials knew the un headquarters that one own men was hundreds of those that were buried. with the language barriers, security concerns and curfews and those were based on civil unrest. it provided a much-needed uplift. miracles would float some hope but the luxury hotel and high and a supermarket was with the broadcast around the world and then they k
and supports those who'd do the same. and a widely hailed message written for cnn.com he presented a call to action, imploring parents to become active participants in changing the reading habits of their kids. on a personal note, when we receive the news that james patterson would be with us at the miami book fair this year, i was more than thrilled. but i was also not surprised that his primary reason for coming was not to promote his books, but instead he wanted to make this session celebrating the notion of family reading. that is what we are going to do this morning. mr. patterson is going to come out and say some words and then we are going to sit down and engage in a bit of a conversation but then we are also going to take questions from the audience so i hope you all have those wheels spinning and start thinking about some questions that you might have. if you're young, don't be intimidated. come right on the as i know you'd love to hear lessons from you too. please give a really, really warm, warm miami and miami book fair welcome to mr. james patterson. [applause] [applause] >>
and the experience she tried to correct it, she was ignored by cnn and of voice of america, every news outlet and around the world published her picture when she went publicly to fix that the revolutionaries accused her of trying to steal the symbol of their hero, the person doing so much to mobilize the revolution and then the government came in and said i want you to say you are still alive and this never happened and she wouldn't do that. they said we will charge you with treason and kill you said she had to leave. she talked about how she lived all the time. i was happy with that interview. i wasn't happy with it, i really do, there is this low point of having people in them and talking to it, but i felt like he got through in a way that any listener could understand what the experience was, and any time i feel that we take a stranger and make them familiar to the listeners i'm really proud of that interviews. i wish we had more individuals on the show in that discussion of trends and policies. everything that goes through the media has to have stakes so the program doesn't become a borin
should begin that as quickly as we can. and i read that cnn.calm piece that she wrote and i was really inspired by it as a bookseller because their missions are very similar to create the next generation of readers. you gave some tips to some parents, but is there a way to oil them down to three import things they can remember? we read in our house could be one. what other tips my parents get? >> is just kind of anything goes. if you go and read, you'll see a lot of parents. like i don't mind if my kid stays up later if they are reading. that's okay, yeah, they read till 11:00, so be it. there's worse things to do in life than not. .. >> i think you can hold them through 11 and 12. that's when it gets tricky with boys. at least if they read well, there's hope. they may pick it up later. they may get distracted. some don't, but a lot do. the key thing is they develop the ability to read pretty well. >> i also know through your work on this whole reading initiative that you have -- i know there's teachers out there as well, and that you have -- >> it's not the schools. >> exactly. [laugh
. the next day cnn came. it was just one media interview after the other. [inaudible] >> i have met him since then. some of the videos are still on youtube. you can believe what you see on tv. they take your photos down, they rearrange or tables, they make a change and i said, i don't think so, i just lost $3.8 million and you want me to make a change. [laughter] my husband is from the retired military and he said i have a fresh pot of coffee. but when we went to the white house for the bill, they called me and said does your daughter to come. we both had been on the train for the obama's since an operation. and i said that i would call her. and the lady we talked to said i'll have to give her clearance and it's not easy. so let me know quickly. so i called my daughter at 6:00 a.m. in the morning. and i told my son-in-law what i needed. an hour in the morning went by and my daughter called back and said did you get five of the same. and i said sure. i was so embarrassed that i call back and i gave them the social security numbers. we walked up to the white house gate that morning and people w
between cnn, fox, and msnbc, partly because i want to hear what's happening and also because i want to hear how they're spinning it, what their views are. probably by the time i get home atneath i already know the major stories because i'm getting e-mail blogs from friends or i'm connected to various web sites that will present breaking news as it comes. i will turn my view -- my views tend to be on the more progressive side so i'll reading thises like slate or the huffington post. what i think i do, even if i try to separate the parts i do because i'm an academic, and that i do as a citizen -- is kind of what we suggest in the book, which i think we need to be news grazers. we need to sample from different sources. i should add in that list the daily show. i'm a regular viewer of the daily show. >> host: what's the important of the daily show in your view? >> guest: i think right now the daily show, and to a somewhat lesser extent the core rather report speak truth to power and do a great job highlighting the important issue office the day and critiqueing both journalist and the po
of obama and the nation next. cnn improved security and economic climate. after four years if obama is reelected. i do not suggest the campbell should not be taken, simply that history playing with politics might give us pause. so what does history project about a second term for barack obama? where he reelect it was so few president having success at that time in office. what are the challenges that face those who had trouble or failed second term and what allowed others to succeed and can barack obama overcome these challenges if he's reelected to become a member of the select group of presidents that waited through the quagmire of the second term and somehow came through relatively unscathed. success in the second term does not imply there were not failures are significant stumbles. some even severe during my tenure. that do not impact how to be the fulfillment of a significant number of the following measures of success. first, the president must provide defense against foreign or domestic dress. secondly, the president must retain or expand economic, political or social opportu
in his cnn i guess sunday morning presentation of his budget. and wednesday of that week he was going to be before the budget committee. and so i would ask you to listen to these words, colleagues and friends, anybody that's watching, and see what they mean to you. he said, "our budget will get us over, over the next several years, to the point where we can look the american people in the eye and say we're not adding to the debt anymore.we're spending money that we have each year" -- money that we have each year -- "and then we can work on bringing down our national deb debt." that was on cnn. so he appeared before the budget committee and i asked him if that was an accurate statement, did he stand by that. "yes, sir." and he never wavered from that. and, madam president, i would just say, as -- that as part of the budget process, you get a stack of documents this much from mr. lew's office. the office of management and budget submits some supporting documents as part of their process. they're easily ascertainable. their numbers are not in dispute. the lowest single deficit over ten y
of his work can be seen in the 24 part cnn television series cold war. a graduate of universal -- yale university, class of, can you help me, i was missing that detail. mr. evans, his book blacklisted by history the untold story of senator joe mccarthy and his fight against america's enemies gives an account of the age of mccarthyism during the cold war. evans has been the recipients of honorary doctorates from institutions like syracuse university and the john marshall law school and has won accuracy in media irvine award for excellence in journalism. join me in welcoming our panelists. [applause] [applause] >> lee, would you like to start? >> it is such a pleasure and honor to be here. once again i was flattered to be asked to participate in the first seminar last year i didn't do too badly. i see some good friends out here and also some people i admire including if senator jim buckley. he deserve a round of applause. let us begin with a paradox. whitaker chambers. whitaker chambers was a soviet spy who became in bill buckley's words, the most important american defector from communi
bandwagon hats back on for another right. on february 21st, 2011. on cnn gts offered a bet that the reigning regime will not be there in a year's time, close quote. two days later and foreign policy, hillary and i took stairstep a nice feature. i recognize the notion that two former u.s. government officials turn university professors betting george soros and anything made an absurd, but that's what we did. we given that not only with the islamic republic still beat the rams government and a year's time, but the balance of influence and power in the middle east to be tilted even further in the favor. almost two years since iris made his feature as they were eager to collect on it. later in 2011, the back-and-forth between ayatollah khomeini, the islamic republic later and president ahmadinejad over the resignation reinstatement of the intelligence minister and other issues. the same cast of iran expert on mainstream media gave developments overblown, even hysterical treatment portraying them as unprecedented signs of an insecure regime. such analyses revealed the very least lamentable ignora
." and was in a limo on the way to the airport with cnn when i received a call that was 404 area code, which is atlanta, so i answered that. and it was congressman john lewis. when we finished talking i thought i should check my text messages because i couldn't keep my voice mail clear enough to keep getting messages, and lo and be hold there was a message from the white house saying the president was trying to reach me. so, i called the number, and they wanted to arrange the call. so, -- so interesting, these people in the immediate -- in media, the person who was in the car with me from cnn, pulled out a camcorder. i said, you cannot tape me while i'm talking to the president. so i made her turn it off and put it away. [applause] >> so, he started out by saying, you're a hard person to reach. well, everyone knew i had been with cnn all week. i didn't say that to him, though. [laughter] >> but anyway, he started out saying, you know, i would be called about a position they wanted to offer, and then he said, you know, those issues you have been putting out there are -- well aware of them. i said, no.
williams that night with a hook up, did questions and the next day cnn came and it was one media radio norman lear called that night and said i will send -- do you know how i am? yes, you made the jeffersons and all in the family. that is what i remember. we videoed all day. it is still running, some of the money youtube. you can't believe what you see on tv because they read around your house, take your phones and the dining room table and coffee table and a cake and i say i don't think so, i logged $3.8 million and you want me to make a cake? he said you got a coffeemaker. my husband is retired military. he is the big coffee person. they had to pour it out and make some more. when we went to the white house for the bill they called me and said you -- does your daughter wants to come? we had both been on the train trip with the obamas and the bidens and i said i will call her and the lady who called set i have to get her cleared and it is not easy so let me know quick. i called my daughter at 6:00 a.m. in the morning, and in another are she called back saying you get five of us in. i
and cnn fact if you have time tonight, if you go to youtube and click into the box, john wayne beats up commies, you will get the final scene of big jim mcclain and you can watch it. it's truly an enjoyable moment. the storyline of big jim mcclain which comes out during this time the election is kind of heating up and by the way john wayne is a political character. is very big in reelecting mccarthy movement. he is often asked after the tend -- convention, what do you think about the ticket and mccarthy says perfectly, i think dick nixon moment to find vice president. no mention of eisenhower because he doesn't really like eisenhower and doesn't fill comfortable with eisenhower. that is the person that wayne is the biggest and supporter. dick jim mcclain comes in 1950 to come the story of a tough guy, big jim and constantly member -- mentions that his six feet three inches on many occasions. he is working for the house un-american activities committee, big jim and big jim goes out to hawaii to break up a communist spy ring mostly made up of doctors in hawaii. in and what he does is defi
and belies what complete hypocrisy the war on women is. a former cnn anchor had a great piece about how paternalistic the president and the administration are towards women. he said, he makes reference to how women are smarter than men. it's all so tired, that kind of fake praise showered upon ones who those think are easy to impress. he said he is having a hard time connecting with tens of millions of americans, many who are are losing hope. they are employing a tone that come across as grading and condescending. i love this part. most women don't want to be patted on the head or treated as wards of the state. they want a chance to succeed based on talents and skills. isn't that so, so true? yet, we are being treated as though we are wards of the state or we should be. the life of julia on president obama's website. the notion, and, by the way, it was not the life of bob. please, take that into account. it was the life of julia to suggest that women in particular need the hand of government from cradle to grave, reaching down and helping us so that we can achieve some level of happines
? >> there was an ad in craigslist and that's not the case. right place right time. a friend of mine was working at cnn as a documentary producer. that's kind of a more normal path into politics. as much as i was interested i was a filmmaker. not first and foremost on anyone's list. she knew i was passionate and water to get involved and brought me. i headed off with the senator and started traveling inside the bubble. >> how long did you do it? was a 24/7 for a while? >> you know, essentially on the campaign it really felt like 24/7. i was technically living in chicago but i was there about two or three days a month. so it was pretty 24/7 budget scale back a bit at the white house because the president is someone who values things like having dinner with his daughters and family. at around dinnertime usually i could have really -- he would go off to do damage stuff and i would do the same. >> who has all the video? >> all the video is that the white house. it all goes into the archives, where none of it is allowed to be a race. according to presidential records act, anything has to be reserved for pro
't accept it at the time. c-span: you worked at cnn for a while? >> guest: six months. c-span: what did you do? >> guest: business news. c-span: why did you leave? >> guest: hated it. c-span: why? >> guest: it wasn't my cup of tea, and i didn't like my boss. c-span: lou dobbs. >> guest: yes. c-span: why? >> guest: i hate to paste him publicly, but i had enough of screamers in my life-time. i didn't want to be screamed at by people anymore. c-span: who are some of the other screamers in television? >> guest: oh, there's lots of screamers in television. it's an abysmal business. you know that, brian. it's actually a great business, but there's a high level of screaming and freneticism and chaos and panic and envy and settling scores. the stakes are high. you're driven by greed and ego. lots of money, lots of ego fed to be on the air, influencing the public. these things are the engine. c-span: did you do any of the screaming? >> guest: sure. c-span: why? >> guest: caught up in the moment. i don't know anybody that hasn't screamed at one time or another in television. maybe one or two people.
and offices with easily ghastly numbers inside god more attention. two days after the quake cnn's ivan watson watch the team of haitian rescue runs try to free an 11-year-old girl whose legs were penned under the concrete. it could reach her but they didn't have equipment to take her out. tiberi child her sunlit rates with powdered concrete whales when severing her leg. without blood for transfusion the invitation could kill her. watson his voice shaking told the anchor in atlanta on a neighboring hill there's a hotel a posh hotel a lot of foreigners were staying at. there were dozens of american french and chilean rescuers they're working to rescue at least one woman named sarah who is trapped but then another heartrending heartrending scream in the rubble stop them cold. even with international attention now on her took the rest of the day to find a generator and a power saw to pull the girl out. she died of her injuries two days later. there are many reasons for this disparity. most foreign rescuers arrived without clear orders where to go. the haitian government had no formal coordination
appearing on cnn's gps offered a bet that, quote: the iranian regime will not be there in a year's time. closed quote. two days later in foreign policy, hillary and i took soros up on his wager. now, i recognize the notion of two former u.s. government officials turned university professors betting george soros on anything might seem a tad absurd, but that's what we did. we even bet that not only would the islamic republic still be iran's government in a year's time, but that the balance of influence and power in the middle east would be tilted even further in its favor. almost two years have elapsed since soros made his wager. i have to say we're pretty eager to collect on it. [laughter] later in 2011 western analysts focused on the back and forth between ayatollah khamenei, the islamic republic's supreme leader, and president ahmadinejad over the resignation and reinstatement of the intelligence minister and other issues. the same cast of iran experts, mainstream media gave these developments overblown, even hysterical treatment, portraying them as, quote: unprecedented finds of an in
was working at cnn as a documentary producer. that's a more normal path into politics, as much as i was interested, i was a fiction filmmaker, not first on anyone's list. she knew i was passionate about politics and wanted to get involved, brought me in, and then i hit it off with the senator and traveled, you know, inside the bubble. >> how long did you do anything? was it 24/7 for you for awhile? >> you know, especially in -- on the campaign, it really felt like 24/7. i was living in chicago, but i was there two or three days a month. it was pretty 24/7, but it's scaled back at the white house because the president is really someone who values having dinner with daughters and family, and so at dinner time, usually, a reasonable chance he would do family stuff. >> who has all the video? >> all the video is at the white house. it's interesting because it goes into the archives where none of it is allowed to be erased according to the presidential records act, anything done service to the president has to preserved for posterity. if he swears by accident or it's out of focus, all of
ever seen was singed good on cnn. and i got asked because of my last name if i was related to him repeatedly. i still haven't met him, but one they wanted to i'm going to thanthank you for opening a lotf doors for me in west texas, just several weeks after 9/11. i went down and i had no experience. i've gone to law school. i didn't clinics in glasgow but i didn't really know what i was doing. i just had to rely on some common sense. i went to the courthouse, spent a lot of time pulling files trying to understand which lawyer represented which person as part of the sting. what was the race of this person, what was the sentence, did they go to trial, typically? i was making a matrix in my head about these cases and trying to understand what it was that is going to try to do. i came back. photocopies i made some quarters but i also spent a lot of time with the families in this town who were somewhat skeptical of a person coming down from new york, rightfully wondering, there's been some interest in these cases that people come and go. i tried to spend much time as i could to really t
with cnn. whoever can address this. how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in security on the day of the inoculation and also how large of an area will be closed off the street closures? >> first i want to apologize for saying there was more than one -- this afternoon but to answer your question we cannot go into detail as far as how many law-enforcement officers will be present for the end i duration and could you repeat your second question form a? [inaudible] >> how much of the area will be closed off? >> we have road closures in effect and i can touch base with you afterwards to provide that. [inaudible] >> with all events that happen on the capital complex we trying constantly to address them. as far specific threats, i can answer that right now but just know that myself -- though not by self, than the united states capital capital place with our law enforcement officers have been trained to address any issues that may come. >> to logistical questions. one is, there are provincials roaming on the mall outside of the capital area. what does that get you
. >> john brennan with cnn. whoever can address this. how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in the security on the day of the inauguration? and, also, how large of an area will be closed off with street closures? >> first to start out, i want to apologize for saying it was morning when it was actually afternoon. to answer your question, we cannot go into detail as far as how many law enforcement officers will be present for the inauguration. and could you repeat your second question for me? >> how many agencies? >> i can't go into detail -- >> how large of an area will be closed off? >> we do have road closures in effect, and i can touch base with you afterwards to provide you with those. >> okay, thank you. >> yes, up front. >> [inaudible] my question is -- [inaudible] >> with all events that happen on the capitol complex, we train constantly to address them. as far as specific threats, i can't answer that right now. but just know that myself -- not myself, excuse me, united states capitol police with our law enforcement partners have trained constantly to
in particular? >> here is cnn is unstable so it's more political. let me stand back. moe is. other than the 15 to 30 people who may be dangerous, everyone agrees is other people are nothing. even if they thought it didn't just in afghanistan for 12 years they really not dangerous people. they basically not being people. so this series that yemen is unstable, that one of these people get out, republicans in congress would give them. one of the reasons some of these people could be released in the united states congress for a guy around and say their dangerous. don't let him near our children. people instead everyone admits error in the same, the uighurs. congress won't let uighurs into the united states. yemen is unstable. we don't want people in the united states. if you don't take the men, why should we take the name? it's a stepping stone. >> five years ago, when more people cared and kind of percolated through globally and domestically that something is deeply wrong and there is criticism, president bush was releasing prisoners. the questions we have now starting from a point of view seems
're reminded every day on cnn and other networks and journalists from "the washington post" -- >> the post mentions it sometimes. >> i want to get that mention in there. [laughter] that we're living in a different kind of world. it's hard to define where this threat is because it pops up everywhere. it's like whack-a-mole, you know? you whack iraq, and you think you get that settled, and all of a sudden you're back in afghanistan, and you do that, and all of a sudden we're having the arab spring, and then we're in libya and algeria and things are happening that pose real threats particularly at a time when the possibility of the combination of a weapon of mass destruction and terrorism can result in an attack on american presence whether it's there or whether it's here. it is a a threat that we, a grave threat that we have to keep reminding the american people that we're only one attack away from a terrorist attack using of mass destruction to, potentially, the total destruction of a major large u.s. city. we don't want to have to reengage our thinking and presence in how we use our securi
that the american public is more wary but never the less, we're reminding every day on cnn n and other networks and journalists from "the washington post . >> talk more i want to get that mentioned in there. we're living in different kind of world. it's hard to define where the threat is because it popping up everywhere. it's like wack a mole. you wack one iraq and you think it get it settles and you're back in afghanistan. and we are in the arab spring and libya and algeria and things are happening that pose real threats particularly at the time when the possibility of the combination of weapons of mass destruction and terrorists can result in attack on american presence whether it's there or here. that is a threat, a grave threat we have to keep reminding the american people that we're only one attack away from a terrorist attack using the weapons of mass destruction potentially the total direction of the major u.s. city. we don't want to have to reengage our thinking and presence and how we use our security forces and diplomacy to address these kinds of things. and post 9-1-1 area. doing it
at national review and columnist for writers opinion in a cnn contributor. after each panel sp, we'll take questions from the audience. but for microphone before you ask your question as it is wise to do with i.q. to be up. finally, please save any protest statements in the form of a question. thanks, we'll turn it to alex. >> thank you, lori. it's a pleasure to be here tonight. this is the earliest i've been out of the office and weeks. what should a supporter of free markets and private enterprise think about immigration? which is good policy be? of course the answer to this question is fairly simple and straightforward. legal immigration, whether through a guestworker program or permanent migration should be a lot easier for most people throughout the world, especially workers. this conclusion is easy and simple to reach, natural for free marketeers. it doesn't really matter what basis to approach, by their natural rate base free marketeers, would you like free market of consequentialism for utilitarian arguments or whether you wish that are ethical intuitionism. the answer is all the s
, we have abdicated the broadcasting a renewed. yes, we have private stations, cnn, fox, nbc, all of that. they are out there. they convey information, but we are not doing what we did during the cold war. our broadcasbroadcas ting board of governors broadcasting board of governors is practically defined in terms of its capacity to be able to tell a message around the world. so we are advocating the ideological arena. and we need to get back into it. we have the best values. with the best america's. most people in the world just want to have a good decent life that is supported by cookies and job and raise their families. and we're letting the jihadists narrative fill a void. we need to get in there. we can do it successfully. >> thank you, mr. chairman. madam secretary, first let me thank you for your service, and i wish you the best in your future endeavors, mostly. [laughter] >> i've got a couple of questions, but i do want to take a moment or two to set a couple of words about our late ambassador for stevens. many members and staff on our committee have had the opportunity to
and microsoft tools combined. the tool is embedded in over six and websites like cnn and facebook. so when you went on facebook that day, there was the information to find your polling place. so these tools were so important to new jersey because of all the changes that we were stressing to voters to know before you go. so even if your polling place was someplace on sunday, that didn't mean it was going to be the same place come tuesday. so maybe the grid went down and we had to move it. maybe, we thought it was going to be open but it wasn't. so we really stressed, utilize one of these tools on tuesday before he went to your polling place. there was a comment earlier about the out of state emergency workers comp and that was a very difficult issue for us because they came from all over the country to assist us. they dropped everything can put their lives on hold to help us and communism when they left they were thinking election. like many people they didn't think about the election into the morning. so they were calling us and asking what, if anything we could do. i know some counties gave t
of these folks had ever seen were with sanjay gupta on cnn, and i got asked if i was related to him repeatedly. i still haven't met him, but one day when i do, i'm going to thank him for opening a lot of doors for me in west texas just several weeks after 9/11. i went down, and i had no experience. i mean, i had gone to law school, i had done clinics in law school, but i didn't really know what i was doing, and i just had to rely on some common sense. so i went to the courthouse. i spent a lot of time pulling files trying to understand, okay, which lawyer represented which person as part of the sting, what was the race of this person, what was the sentence of this person? did they go to trial, did they plea? i literally was making a matrix in my head about these cases and trying to understand what it was that i was going to try to do. um, i came back, i bought a suitcase at wal-mart because i had to stuff it with a whole bunch of papers and photocopies that i had made from the courthouse. i also, by the way, spent a lot of time with the families in this town who were somewhat skeptical of a perso
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)